Satisfied, Maybe

Brosnan

Part of what accounts for the well-remarked-on pipe-acquisition disorder (PAD) and tobacco-acquisition disorder (TAD) is the all-too-human (I think) proclivity to value what we have less than what we are yet to have. I have way too much opened tobacco, each blend of which I was excited to acquire — only to find that I was much less excited once it became part of my stash. The excitement diminished not because I enjoyed it less than I had anticipated — I might well have thoroughly enjoyed it– but precisely because I now had it. For a blend to generate similar excitement in me now, it had to possess the characteristic of not being in my stash. The same goes for pipes. I badly want a blend or pipe that I don’t yet have, and when I have it — because I have it — I value it less, and I look to the next one. (Forgive me if I generalize without warrant; maybe I am the only human being who “suffers” this malady, though I suspect I am not.)

Is this a problem? It can be. I have too little time to enjoy what I already have; the day has only so many hours. What’s more, if I acquire blend or pipe Y, I will thereby have less time to get to know and appreciate blend or pipe X. It is not money that now makes me hesitate to acquire that next blend or pipe — it’s time!

I’m working overtime to appreciate what I have and not to think about what I don’t have. With temptation all around me, the task is not easy.